Rides

These rides are open to all comers – PenVelo does not sponsor, run, plan, lead, or direct these or any other rides. Before participating in one of these rides, please read the Warning and Assumption of Risk at the bottom of this page (click HERE).

A word of warning – more often than not a newcomer is challenged by the pace. Don’t be discouraged though! If you get dropped there’s plenty of great riding along the route and you can get back in with the pack when it comes around the loop and heads north on Canada Road. Heck, we all got dropped when we started doing these rides!

*** ALL RIDES START AT THE NORTH END OF CANADA ROAD BY HIGHWAY 92  (map)***

8:15am Saturday – “no wait” ride

Start at 92/Canada.  After riding counter-clockwise around the Portola Valley loop, there’s a regroup at the Chevron station on Woodside Road, immediately after turning off Whiskey Hill Road.  Strava link: http://www.strava.com/segments/3609104

 

8:00am Sunday – “no-wait” ride

Fast pace.

Start at 92/Canada.  After riding counter-clockwise around the Portola Valley loop, there’s an optional regroup at the Chevron station on Woodside Road, immediately after turning off Whiskey Hill Road.  Strava link: http://www.strava.com/segments/3609104

6:00pm Tuesday and Thursday – “no wait” rides

Very fast pace, typically averaging 22-24 mph.

These rides start on the first Tuesday after the beginning of daylight savings time in March, and end on the third Thursday in September.  Note, this time span largely coincides with the Racing Season. These rides are very fast paced with a great deal of aggressive riding.

On Tuesday night, the ride turns east (left) off Canada Road onto Woodside Road at Roberts Market and continues around the Portola Valley loop in a clockwise direction as indicated in the Strava links below. These rides differ from the weekend rides as they’re routed directly along Alpine Road. On Thursday, the route is the same as the Tuesday ride except in the counter-clockwise direction, by turning west (right) onto Woodside Road.

Tuesday night Strava link: http://www.strava.com/segments/4069206

Thursday night Strava link: http://www.strava.com/segments/3609213

5:50pm Tuesday and Thursday “B” rides

For riders desiring a less intense evening ride (19 – 22 mph average), the “B” ride departs from Canada/92 at 5:50 PM. This timing often allows for the B group to rejoin the main ride back up Canada Rd to the finish. The Thursday “B” ride follows the same route as the main Thursday evening group ride above, while the Tuesday “B” ride takes a shortcut back along Mountain Home Road.

Tuesday night “B” Strava link: http://www.strava.com/segments/6880378

 

Warning and Your Assumption of Risk:

With regard to all rides, PenVelo is not responsible for anything that happens.   Other than with regard to registered riders for the San Bruno Hill Climb, Burlingame Criterium, and Beat the Clock series, PenVelo does not sponsor, run, plan, lead, or direct these or any other rides.  PenVelo does not recommend that you participate in any ride, and advises great caution and personal consideration before assuming the risk of riding your bike, alone or in a group.  The sport of cycling is done for enjoyment and thrill, requires physical exertion as well as elements of skill, and involves a challenge containing a potential risk of injury. Whether alone or in a group, at any pace, cycling fundamentally involves hazards that can lead to the serious injury or death of you or others.  Road conditions, other bicyclists, motor vehicles, wind, water, road debris (including rocks, oil, leaves, sticks, glass, and metal pieces), mechanical and tire failures, falling and windborne objects, and poor lighting are just some examples of the inherent risks involved that can lead to crashes or other injuries.  Safety equipment such as helmets, lights, and appropriate clothing may reduce a few risks to a degree, but do not change the risky nature of the sport.  Riding in a group is a fundamental aspect of the sport and an ordinary activity associated with the sport of cycling, but increases some of these inherent hazards, as it often involves decreased sightlines, increased speeds, aggressive riding, potential collisions with other riders, and other increased risks.  Finally, bicycling can lead to acute or chronic health conditions, including death; your physician can advise you on such matters, and you may find the National Institutes of Health Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans helpful.  Your participation in the recreational sport of bicycling, including riding with other riders, shows that you are voluntarily assuming all of the foregoing risks.